Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Darkness Falls & Tooth Fairy: Tooth Fairy

The Tooth Fairy is not a very popular folklore tale in Brazil. Everything is pretty new for us, Brazilians. I selected two completely different scenes about the tale. One is a pretty scare version of the story - Darkness Falls (Adults only,please) - and the second one - The tooth Fairy - has a naive, but popular view of the subject. I hope you like them.





I. Divide the class into three groups. Each group reads one of the passages about the tooth fairy below. Then have one person from each of the groups form a new group and share what they read about the tale.



THE TOOTH FAIRY FIGURE:


The tooth fairy is a fantasy figure of early childhood.[1] The folklore states that when a child loses a baby tooth, if he or she places it beneath the bed pillow, the tooth fairy will visit while the child sleeps, replacing the lost tooth with a small payment.[2]

The tradition of leaving a tooth under a pillow for the tooth fairy to collect is practiced in various countries.
74 percent of those surveyed, believed the tooth fairy to be female, while 12 percent believed the tooth fairy to be neither male nor female and 8 percent believed the tooth fairy could be either male or female. One review of published children's books and popular artwork found the tooth fairy to also be depicted as a child with wings,  two little old men, a dental hygienist, a potbellied flying man smoking a cigar, a bat, a bear and others. 

THE TOOTH FAIRY IN SPANISH SPEAKING COUNTRIES AND EUROPE:


Ratón Pérez, "Pérez Mouse" in English) is a figure popular in Spanish and Hispanic American cultures, similar to the tooth fairy, originating in Madrid in 1894. As is traditional in some English-speaking countries, when a child loses a tooth it is customary for him or her to place it under the pillow, so that Ratoncito Pérez will exchange it for a gift. The tradition is almost universal in Spanish cultures, but takes different forms in different areas. He is known as "Ratoncito Pérez" in Spanish speaking countries, with the exception of some regions of Mexico, Peru and Chile, where he is called "el Ratón de los Dientes" (The Tooth Mouse), and in Argentina, Venezuela, Uruguay and Colombia, he is known simply as "El Ratón Pérez". In Italy, the tooth fairy is also often replaced by a small mouse. In France, and in French-speaking Belgium, this character is called la petite souris ("the little mouse"). From parts of Scotland comes a tradition similar to the fairy mouse: a white fairy rat who purchases children's teeth with coins.

THE TOOTH FAIRY IN ASIA:


In some Asian countries, such as India, China, Japan, Korea and Vitnam, when a child loses a tooth, it is customary for him or her to throw it onto the roof if it came from the lower jaw, or into the space beneath the floor if it came from the upper jaw. While doing this, the child shouts a request for the tooth to be replaced with the tooth of a mouse. This tradition is based on the fact that the teeth of mice grow for their entire lives, a characteristic of all rodents. In Japan, a different variation calls for lost upper teeth to be thrown straight down to the ground and lower teeth straight up into the air; the idea is that incoming teeth will grow in straight. In Middle Eastern countries, there is a tradition of throwing a baby tooth up into the sky to the sun or to Allah. This tradition may originate in a pre-Islamic offering, and dates back to at least the 13th century. 

II. Watch the movie segments below. Then answer the questions that follow.


video















Darkness Falls:

1. How is the legend of the Tooth Fairy shown in the segment?

2. Is the Tooth Fairy similar to the ones you read about? Explain it.

3. Is it a child's story? Why (not)?

4. What does this story have in common with the texts you read about?


The Tooth Fairy:

video















1. How is the legend of the Tooth Fairy shown in the segment?

2. Is the Tooth Fairy similar to the ones you read about? Explain it.

3. Is it a child's story? Why (not)?

4. What does this story have in common with the texts you read about?


III. Imagine that you are interviewing the Tooth Fairy.

Student 1 interviews Student 2 - the Tooth Fairy of the Darkness Falls segment.

Then switch roles.

Student 2 interviews the Tooth fairy in the Tooth Fairy segment. Use your imagination to answer the questions.


1)
What do you do with all the teeth?

2) 
How do you get through windows? 

3) 
I lost a tooth, and I can't find it. Will you still come visit me?

4) 
How do you travel from house to house?

5) 
Where do you get all your money to trade for the teeth?

6) 
Where do you live?

7) 
Can I be a Tooth Fairy?

8) 
Why didn't you come and get my tooth?

9) 
How do you know my name and where I live?

10) 
Do animals lose their teeth? If so, do you collect those teeth?

11)
Is there more than one Tooth Fairy?

12) 
How old are you?

13)
How do you get my tooth without waking me up?

14) 
How did you become The Tooth Fairy?



IV. Finally, check the real Tooth Fairy answers at the end of the post. The answers are on the same site and the answers are really creative.

 
Taken from the awesome and creative site http://www.toothfairyland.com/TFLwrite.html


What do you do with all the teeth?
The Tooth Fairy Helpers put the teeth in special boxes designed just for each child's lost teeth. We use the teeth to build just about everything at Tooth Fairyland. Sometimes the teeth shine so bright, you can see them as stars at night. You can even pick out and name your own star.  Look Here:  Name a Star  

How do you get through windows?
Part of being The Tooth Fairy is that I have special magic. I can use my magic to go right through your window. But it only works if you are sleeping. 

I lost a tooth, and I can't find it. Will you still come visit me?
Of course I will. As long as the tooth is lost, the Tooth Fairy will know about it. Usually I will dispatch Tooth Fairy Helper Argyle to find the lost tooth. He is the best lost tooth finder in all of Tooth Fairyland. Often a child will write a special note for me and leave that note under the pillow. Here at Tooth Fairyland a note from a child is just as magical as the lost tooth. 

How do you travel from house to house?
I'm a magical fairy and I travel on the mystical energy of fairy flight. Sometimes you can see the trail I leave way up in the sky when the night is as dark as it is going to get. But, most children are fast asleep at this hour of the night. 

Where do you get all your money to trade for the teeth?
There are several secret and loving adults that have a lot of money. They give money to me so I can trade it for your lost teeth. Maybe one day when you get older you will be able to donate money to me so I can trade it for other children's teeth. 


Where do you live?
I live at Tooth Fairyland -- hidden away up in the sky. 
Can I be a Tooth Fairy?
Maybe one day, you can be a Tooth Fairy Helper. But, those are jobs for grown ups. For now, I need you to be a child. You should enjoy growing up, making friends, learning at school, and ALWAYS be sure to take care of your teeth.

Why didn't you come and get my tooth?
Even though I can fly as fast as Fairy Speed Eleven, I just can't get to every lost tooth in one night. Sometimes there are so many lost teeth to collect. Sometimes the weather (especially blizzards and hurricanes) causes me to have to slow down, and I get behind. Just remember to leave your tooth for me, and I will get to it. Sometimes I have to work overtime on the weekends to get caught up. But I'll always come and get your lost teeth. 

How do you know my name and where I live?
Tooth Fairyland is full of Tooth Fairy Helpers. One such helper is Tooth Fairy Helper Emma. She is the keeper of the names, address, and map books. Emma and the other Tooth Fairy Helpers who work with her spend their days and nights making sure they know all the children's names and where they live. Every night, before I go to collect teeth, Tooth Fairy Helper Emma gives me the list of names and addresses to visit. 

Do animals lose their teeth? If so, do you collect those teeth?
Many animals do lose their baby teeth. However, there is a completely different Animal Tooth Fairy who collects those teeth. And, believe it or not, he leaves special little treats for the animals to eat when they wake up. The Animal Tooth Fairy is so busy that I hardly ever get to see him. But sometimes we meet up for a healthy snack. 

Is there more than one Tooth Fairy?
Nope. I am the only Tooth Fairy for people. Remember that there is an Animal Tooth Fairy. 

How old are you?
I know I look like a child, but I am very very, very, very old. I'm so old, that I stopped counting. I don't really remember when my birthday is. But every year on January 1st, the Tooth Fairy Helpers and I celebrate my birthday. I'm so old that I can remember when people didn't even live in houses. 

How do you get my tooth without waking me up?
Part of being The Tooth Fairy is that I have Tooth Fairy Magic. Using my magic, I can move very quiet and very fast. So quiet and so fast that you don't wake up when I get your tooth...even if it is under your pillow! 

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